SATs

Scaled scores for 2023 key stage 2 SATs announced

DfE publishes marks pupils need to meet the 'expected' standard

DfE publishes marks pupils need to meet the 'expected' standard

The Department for Education has today released the marks pupils needed for the 2023 key stage 2 SATs to achieve the government’s “expected” score.

To meet government expectations, pupils must achieve 100 in their scaled scores. But this equates to different marks for each paper (maths; reading; grammar, punctuation and spelling) and can change each year.

Converting a pupil’s raw score to a scaled score simply requires looking up the raw score on the tables below, and reading across to the appropriate scaled score. The tables are also available on the government’s website here.

The marks required for 2023 on each of the key stage 2 SATs tests are:

– Maths: 56 out of 110 (down from 58 in 2022)

– Reading: 24 out of 50 (down from 29 in 2022)

– Grammar, punctuation and spelling: 36 out of 70 (up from 35 in 2022)

2023 scaled scores for key stage 2 maths SATs

2023 scaled scores for key stage 2 reading SATs

2023 scaled scores for key stage 2 grammar, punctuation and spelling SATs

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3 Comments

  1. Has the damage been done with the reading paper? Perhaps too little too late?

    SATs should be the opportunity for children to show off their learning and not to leave them crushed. Dropping the scaled score may not be enough.

    • Helen

      Well said, my child is completely crushed after results, teachers told them before telling us, left us to pick up the pieces of a child who thinks she is now a failure at 11.

  2. wojciech

    To be honest first time we went trough this, and as we discovered in Jan, those marks are not actually used for anything apart check where you are as kid, what else you need, now taken for next school etc….. so we prepped and explained this to our son, he went for them without any stress and did not really care on the outcome, it was only to see the gaps. He did great, I think the pressure about the score is unwanted at all, and feedback should be done in positive way as this doesn’t count towards anything apart big stats for government or schools to see how they perform, btu this is not reflection on the kids or skills they have only as step check in y opinion what to improve