Election 2024

Dear Bridget, Please take your time to build a real legacy

Ahead of your meeting with sector leaders to reset the relationship, here are five things we all back you to deliver

Ahead of your meeting with sector leaders to reset the relationship, here are five things we all back you to deliver

8 Jul 2024, 13:06

Dear Secretary of State,

Congratulations on your electoral success! Your in-tray must be daunting, but I hope you might find time to consider five pleas as you confront the many challenges facing our education system.

Show that you value the workforce

This might seem obvious, but we have not always seen it from your predecessors. I have lost track of the number of times guidance has been issued by the DfE during the school holiday, for example, causing unnecessary stress for staff in schools. The same goes for the tendency for titbits to be briefed to friendly newspapers before a policy is released officially.

You will not be able to keep the whole teaching profession happy all the time, but if you treat us with courtesy and use your voice to build public esteem for the school workforce you will have an invaluable reserve of goodwill.

Don’t weaponise education policy

Recent government ministers have sometimes appeared more interested in using education policy to score political points than to improve education. They have often relied on non-statutory guidance to communicate expectations, which looks suspiciously like a cop-out from the chalkface. Guidance on gender questioning children, for example, left schools having to choose between ignoring the DfE and opening themselves up to potential legal challenges.

Some issues are challenging enough to manage without anyone seeking to stoke flames. Education policy should address the most pressing problems in a proportionate way and should be possible to implement without breaking the law.

The best policy might not be education policy

Schools can make a huge difference to the lives of young people, but they cannot fix social problems alone. Since the years of austerity, much of the support network around schools, such as specialist provision for mental health, has deteriorated or disappeared, and school staff have been left picking up the pieces.

Rebuilding in this area and taking measures to alleviate child poverty, such as lifting the two-child benefit cap, would do more to enable young people to make the most of their educational opportunities than any reforms aimed at the education system itself.

Don’t throw away everything the Tories did

There have been some noteworthy successes in education over the past fourteen years. Among those, hard-won improvements in teaching have helped to propel England up the international rankings in reading and maths. They should be secured, not swept away.

Labour’s manifesto gave cause for confidence that the party has recognised and will build on developments in areas like curriculum design. This is encouraging in advance of your promised curriculum and assessment review, since evidence suggests it would be unwise to emulate Scottish and Welsh moves towards cross-curricular themes and skills at the expense of academic subjects.

Educational time runs slower than political time

Since the children about to finish year six first joined their reception classes, we have had nine incumbents in your office. Unsurprisingly, these politicians have had little opportunity to do more than chase fleeting news cycles and social media trends.

By contrast, meaningful school improvement is often incremental and workforce expertise takes time to build. For this reason we desperately need better retention of current teachers, not just recruitment of new ones. We also need politicians who are willing to forgo an eye-catching headline in favour of sowing seeds which will bear fruit in the long-run, such as reforming SEND provision.

I hope Labour ministers will be given more time to make their mark, but however long you are in post, please prioritise policy which will bring sustainable benefits.

Your manifesto represents a promising starting point, although more will be needed to secure a lasting educational legacy. I wish you the very best of luck in this endeavour, and I know that a vast number of my colleagues across the profession do too.

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  1. As a Headteacher of 6 non academy schools, ex Ofsted Inspector and NLE, I have to say that this article missed a couple of my hopes for a new relationship.

    Ofsted – reset the card. Remove gradings and give statements around “This school provides a good quality education” or “This school does not yet provide a good quality education”. Publish a thoughtful report on the strengths and targets for the school. The majority of my schools are Outstanding and I would give it up in a heartbeat.

    Review SEND funding, allocation and re visit the word ‘ inclusion’. Serial underfunding and complexities in the system have left children languishing in the system without suitably strong provision. This is not a criticism of mainstream primary or secondary. It is the current broken reality.

    Review the quality of MAT and academies structures and do not penalise schools, or groups of schools who do not follow this path. We are out there and successful. Many models make a multifarious offer.

    Recruitment and retention of teachers and leaders. There is a crisis within the profession, there needs to be a serious review on how we might focus a cohesive approach to build a profession that is respected and invested in. I greatly miss the National College who led on research and development and offered an inspirational professional structure.