Multiple sclerosis proves no barrier to success

Multiple sclerosis proves no barrier to success

A student diagnosed with multiple sclerosis during her second year of college graduated today with a host of BTEC and A-level qualifications.

Emily Whiley (pictured), a student at Giles Academy in Lincolnshire, received her diagnosis during year 13, and her health deteriorated throughout her studies.

Today she discovered she had achieved three merits in her BTEC level three subsidiary diploma in media, her subsidiary diploma in photography and her subsidiary diploma in graphics, along with an E in A-level photography, and a D in A-level graphics.

As a result, she has secured a place at the University of Lincoln to study photography.

Unathi Dambuza

Of her achievements, she said: “Due to certain circumstances regarding my health, sixth-form was a great struggle to keep up with the demands of my courses. I am so proud of myself for pulling through and receiving the results I did, all thanks to the ongoing and continued support from my friends and teachers”.

She isn’t the only success story from the Boston academy.

Unathi Dambuza (pictured right) also overcame the odds to secure a distinction in the BTEC level three diploma in art and design, a distinction* in his BTEC subsidiary diploma in graphics, and two Cs in A-level art and design, and graphics.

Unathi entered the academy three years ago after moving with his parents from South Africa.

He had no formal qualifications, but was keen to pursue a career in architecture and studied level two qualifications at the academy before taking on his A-levels.

He now has a place at De Montford University to study architecture.

“Today, I am thrilled with my results, especially considering it a culmination of three years of hard work adjusting to a different environment and culture,” he said.

“I came over to the UK from South Africa with no qualifications and am leaving sixth form today with the equivalent of five A-levels. I couldn’t be happier with my achievements.”