Ofsted launches official ‘good’ logo in policy U-turn

Ofsted launches official 'good' logo in policy U-turn

Ofsted has launched a new “good” logo for schools to display on their websites and in literature – just seven months after vowing to clamp down on schools using bogus logos for grade two ratings.

Investigations by Schools Week and sister paper FE Week last year revealed how hundreds of schools were using bogus “good” logos. The watchdog’s policy at the time was that only “outstanding” schools could use its official logo.

An unnamed training provider had even been threatened with court action by the watchdog for using a modified version of an Ofsted “good” logo.

But the watchdog announced today it has extended its policy to allow “good” schools to use a new official logo. A spokesperson said the move followed feedback from organisations and a review of its existing policies.

Some schools had hit out at Ofsted for focusing its resources on “pursuing schools and colleges” who wanted to celebrate a ‘good inspection with their local communities.

The watchdog has also redesigned its ‘outstanding provider’ logo.

Education providers currently holding either an “outstanding” or “good” rating can apply for the new logos online.

Schools can now use their unique reference number to download the relevant logo in formats including for use on websites and stationery.

But the watchdog warned only schools currently with one of the top two ratings can apply. Logos are also not allowed to be used by third parties, other than “in specific circumstances we have agreed to”, Ofsted said.

The “good” logo decision marks a major shift from Ofsted. Schools Week revealed in October how the watchdog was clamping down on logo misuse and promised to take action against any schools, colleges or other training providers found to be using them inappropriately.

A spokesperson said at the time: “We believe it is right that permission to use the logo should be limited to those who have achieved the highest Ofsted grade of outstanding.”

However Schools Week reported at the time the watchdog could revisit the policy.